linda intro 3.jpg
linda 1-2.jpg
 “When I was first “living in the elements” (I don’t say “homeless” because I didn’t feel homeless), I was staying at the Urban Rescue Mission.”

“When I was first “living in the elements” (I don’t say “homeless” because I didn’t feel homeless), I was staying at the Urban Rescue Mission.”

 “In the summer of 2014, my friends and I were on our way back from dinner. There was a group of people across the street playing music, and there was a man singing along to Smokey Robinson. Me and my two friends joined him, pretending to be the back up singers. Then we started dancing with him.”

“In the summer of 2014, my friends and I were on our way back from dinner. There was a group of people across the street playing music, and there was a man singing along to Smokey Robinson. Me and my two friends joined him, pretending to be the back up singers. Then we started dancing with him.”

 “I realized in that moment, that being in Skid Row didn’t mean you had to be unhappy. And that night, singing with people I didn’t even know, just being able to be that open in that moment, allowed me to have the feeling I’ve now felt for the rest of my time here.”

“I realized in that moment, that being in Skid Row didn’t mean you had to be unhappy. And that night, singing with people I didn’t even know, just being able to be that open in that moment, allowed me to have the feeling I’ve now felt for the rest of my time here.”

 “None of the preconceived notions of Skid Row apply any more. In that moment, my notion was that I could be happy here. It was just a moment’s realization of, ‘I’m ok.’ I knew I landed on my feet. I felt as though I fell into grace inside of myself.“

“None of the preconceived notions of Skid Row apply any more. In that moment, my notion was that I could be happy here. It was just a moment’s realization of, ‘I’m ok.’ I knew I landed on my feet. I felt as though I fell into grace inside of myself.“

 “Joining Urban Voices Project continued this. It allows me to find my voice and have peace with myself.”

“Joining Urban Voices Project continued this. It allows me to find my voice and have peace with myself.”

 “People who are new to the choir always say how nervous they are to perform. I tell them, ‘You’re in a group, we’re not gonna let you fall. We hold each other up.’”

“People who are new to the choir always say how nervous they are to perform. I tell them, ‘You’re in a group, we’re not gonna let you fall. We hold each other up.’”

linda-4.jpg
 Urban Voices Project offers free weekly workshops in singing, performance, music healing, music theory and composition.

Urban Voices Project offers free weekly workshops in singing, performance, music healing, music theory and composition.

linda class 2.jpg
linda-11.jpg
 “Here I’m enjoying the moment after singing. That peaceful moment. I felt like we had touched people with our performance.”

“Here I’m enjoying the moment after singing. That peaceful moment. I felt like we had touched people with our performance.”

 “We sang the Hallelujah Chorus and it was something I had always wanted to do. Once when I was a sophomore in high school in New York, I went to the beach with my sister. There at the beach was a group of high school students singing the Hallelujah Chorus together. And I said ‘Oh my God, they’re so awesome. One day I want to perform that.’ So at 70 years old I finally got to do what I wanted to do when I was 17.”

“We sang the Hallelujah Chorus and it was something I had always wanted to do. Once when I was a sophomore in high school in New York, I went to the beach with my sister. There at the beach was a group of high school students singing the Hallelujah Chorus together. And I said ‘Oh my God, they’re so awesome. One day I want to perform that.’ So at 70 years old I finally got to do what I wanted to do when I was 17.”

linda-12.jpg
linda intro 3.jpg
linda 1-2.jpg
 “When I was first “living in the elements” (I don’t say “homeless” because I didn’t feel homeless), I was staying at the Urban Rescue Mission.”
 “In the summer of 2014, my friends and I were on our way back from dinner. There was a group of people across the street playing music, and there was a man singing along to Smokey Robinson. Me and my two friends joined him, pretending to be the back up singers. Then we started dancing with him.”
 “I realized in that moment, that being in Skid Row didn’t mean you had to be unhappy. And that night, singing with people I didn’t even know, just being able to be that open in that moment, allowed me to have the feeling I’ve now felt for the rest of my time here.”
 “None of the preconceived notions of Skid Row apply any more. In that moment, my notion was that I could be happy here. It was just a moment’s realization of, ‘I’m ok.’ I knew I landed on my feet. I felt as though I fell into grace inside of myself.“
 “Joining Urban Voices Project continued this. It allows me to find my voice and have peace with myself.”
 “People who are new to the choir always say how nervous they are to perform. I tell them, ‘You’re in a group, we’re not gonna let you fall. We hold each other up.’”
linda-4.jpg
 Urban Voices Project offers free weekly workshops in singing, performance, music healing, music theory and composition.
linda class 2.jpg
linda-11.jpg
 “Here I’m enjoying the moment after singing. That peaceful moment. I felt like we had touched people with our performance.”
 “We sang the Hallelujah Chorus and it was something I had always wanted to do. Once when I was a sophomore in high school in New York, I went to the beach with my sister. There at the beach was a group of high school students singing the Hallelujah Chorus together. And I said ‘Oh my God, they’re so awesome. One day I want to perform that.’ So at 70 years old I finally got to do what I wanted to do when I was 17.”
linda-12.jpg

“When I was first “living in the elements” (I don’t say “homeless” because I didn’t feel homeless), I was staying at the Urban Rescue Mission.”

“In the summer of 2014, my friends and I were on our way back from dinner. There was a group of people across the street playing music, and there was a man singing along to Smokey Robinson. Me and my two friends joined him, pretending to be the back up singers. Then we started dancing with him.”

“I realized in that moment, that being in Skid Row didn’t mean you had to be unhappy. And that night, singing with people I didn’t even know, just being able to be that open in that moment, allowed me to have the feeling I’ve now felt for the rest of my time here.”

“None of the preconceived notions of Skid Row apply any more. In that moment, my notion was that I could be happy here. It was just a moment’s realization of, ‘I’m ok.’ I knew I landed on my feet. I felt as though I fell into grace inside of myself.“

“Joining Urban Voices Project continued this. It allows me to find my voice and have peace with myself.”

“People who are new to the choir always say how nervous they are to perform. I tell them, ‘You’re in a group, we’re not gonna let you fall. We hold each other up.’”

Urban Voices Project offers free weekly workshops in singing, performance, music healing, music theory and composition.

“Here I’m enjoying the moment after singing. That peaceful moment. I felt like we had touched people with our performance.”

“We sang the Hallelujah Chorus and it was something I had always wanted to do. Once when I was a sophomore in high school in New York, I went to the beach with my sister. There at the beach was a group of high school students singing the Hallelujah Chorus together. And I said ‘Oh my God, they’re so awesome. One day I want to perform that.’ So at 70 years old I finally got to do what I wanted to do when I was 17.”

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