LEFT BEHIND

Left Behind explores the overlap of public and private spaces, consumer behavior, and human impact on the environment through the discarded objects I encounter on the streets of Los Angeles.

What do objects mean when they leave human ownership and enter the public sphere? I’m fascinated by this overlapping of private lives and public spaces. When man-made objects are left on the street, onlookers become voyeurs, in a sense. We glimpse the lives of these people who left behind their things.

To me, discarded objects also capture the complicated relationship between people and the things people make and consume. We think of objects as transient: we buy them, use them, and discard them when their purpose no longer holds. Yet, man-made objects can take generations to decompose. In reality, human ownership is only a small chapter in the lifespan of objects.

Objects, then, tell a larger story. Our objects are what we leave behind. They are the crumbs future generations will follow if they hope to understand us.